Announcing Our New Name – LGBT HealthLink: The Network for Health Equity

Headshot Scout
Director of CenterLink’s Network for LGBT Health Equity
If you’ve ever stumbled over our name, you are not alone. We originally designed the name of the Network for LGBT Health Equity to be crystal clear about who were were as we built awareness among state departments of health but as we all heard, it was long and people stumbled over it often.

A year ago, we moved our organization to CenterLink, the community of LGBT Centers. We are really enjoying being so integrated with community centers across the land and want to tell everyone where we live.

It’s time, we now need a new name that reflects our home and how we’re not the new kids on the block any more.

So please welcome me in introducing our new name…

LGBT HealthLink

The Network for Health Equity

If you liked us before, you will love us now. It will also be easier to remember our new name and our new home.

Stay tuned as we really start to do more brand building on this name over the next year. We want to be as well known among LGBT leadership as we are to state departments of health. If you’ve got any good ideas for that, we’re all ears!

Top Goals of the Tobacco & Cancer Disparity Networks for Coming Year

Headshot Scout
Director of CenterLink’s Network for LGBT Health Equity
Yes, I’m still at the same meeting (I know it’s only 60 seconds later)… and our next question was what were our top goals for the coming year? So, let’s jump right in.

Top Goals for Next Year

National Council for Behavioral Health / mental health

  • Continue to hold state strategy sessions to see what’s been done and where there are opportunities to move the needle.
  • Examine their current (extensive) workforce development programs to see how tobacco & cancer information can be bolstered
  • Looking to leverage more opportunities to collaborate and coordinate with the sister networks as a body

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan / American Indian

  • Looking to promote lung cancer screening, awareness and availability. (there’s low awareness on this now)
  • Creating information repositories on their website, of toolkits, links to outside information, etc.
  • Promoting tobacco screening for youth in tribal clinics through onsite trainings
  • Promoting community and clinical linkages among the tribal health clinics

RAISE / Asian American/Pacific Islander

  • Disseminating cancer and tobacco equity information to the different partners
  • Providing technical assistance to the different partners
  • Coming big 20th anniversary conference in SF

Patient Advocacy Foundation / low socioeconomic status

  • Build the network!
  • Launch a website
  • Leaning into media and social media to get information out to the people who really need to understand resources

CADCA / geographic health equity

  • Engage the network partners in meaningful ways, especially the sister disparity networks
  • Amplify the message by building a following for the network on social media
  • Building breadth & depth, especially starting conversations about how we define ourselves as a community. Maybe an Instagram campaign of selfies?
  • Building capacity & coalition, looking at readiness of different states to change policies.
  • Being a repository for information

LGBT Network (<– guess who)

  • Enduring the fallout after we give a bunch of states F’s on their LGBT inclusion report cards/rebuilding relationships with some states/providing more technical assistance to states to help them up their game
  • Launching, with the National LGBT Cancer Network, the first ever National LGBT Cancer Action Plan
  • Launching, with the National LGBT Cancer Network, the first LGBT Cancer Best Practices compilation
  • Creating model wellness policies for LGBT community centers, working with centers to see who can adopt these policies

NAATPN / African American/African

  • Intercultural Cancer Council created a guide about how to work with specific populations related to health disparities, looking to expand and finish it in year 2.
  • Looking for other cities that might adopt the Chicago model to ban flavored cigarette sales near schools
  • Work with the SouthEast Intercultural Cancer Council region to drill down into a system or policy change which can be implemented to affect cancer disparities.
  • The faith based summit in year one has really taken off, looking to expand it in year two.

National Alliance for Hispanic Health

  • Continuing to build the infrastructure of the network
  • Look at secondhand smoke and see how it affects different populations, especially in the southeast
  • Promote skin/cervical/colorectal cancer awareness and screening to coincide with and support CDC’s emphasis on same

Top Accomplishments of Tobacco & Cancer Disparity Networks This Year

Headshot Scout
Director of CenterLink’s Network for LGBT Health Equity
Hey y’all — Daniella and Liz (National LGBT Cancer Network) and I are all down in Atlanta this week for the gathering of all the 50 state cancer program staff. But first, we get a few days to meet with our sister disparity networks. We’re about to come up on our first year anniversary of having this new expanded funding for cancer too. So as part of our introductions, we’re going over our biggest accomplishments of the past year. Thought I’d take notes as best I could to help you see what the different disparity networks have been up to.
If the focus of their network isn’t clear by their name, I’ve put their official focus right after the name.
National Council for Behavioral Health / mental health equity
  • Launch their newsletter
  • Have a series of webinars, including one with tobacco leadership + one on LGBT outreach
  • Convening 9 states for a leadership summit on tobacco and cancer

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan / American Indian

  • Building infrastructure
  • Continuing/expanding their webinar series
  • Identifying areas they want to grow in the future

RAISE / Asian American/Pacific Islander

  • Developed their own website http://www.appealforhealth.org/RAISE
  • Launched a blog to highlight their work
  • Moving into social media, watch for #RAISEwellness hashtag
  • Web portal with culturally specific cancer materials (through partnership)

Patient Advocacy Foundation / low socioeconomic health equity

  • They just got the award a few weeks ago, so their biggest accomplishment is getting the award

Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (CADCA) / geographic health equity

  • Just funded this year so many of their accomplishments are in building their network
  • Doing a lot of theory work, creating a model of change for the work
  • Listening sessions from community leadership
  • Build new website, new brand
  • Held in person symposium gathering needs input
  • Forthcoming supplement in 300 newspapers around the country on geographic disparities)

LGBT Network (<– us!)

  • launched/curated Wellness page on Huffington Post Gay Voices + weekly top LGBT Wellness news series
  • held first National LGBT Cancer Summit
  • launched tobacco infographic in conjunction with 50th anniversary Surgeon General’s report (#SGR50), got 14 news stories off that release
  • surveyed all community centers for baseline info on existing wellness policies & practices
  • launched template wellness needs assessment, currently being used by AR, MI, and forthcoming for WI, VT.
  • surveyed community centers to establish baseline of wellness activities/policies
  • Coming in days, new website!

National African American Tobacco Prevention Network

  • Worked with Chicago to help the City move to restricting selling flavored tobacco (menthol) near public schools.
  • Worked with Intercultural Cancer Council to create a weeklong workshop on health disparities
  • Hosting a faith based summit to educate leadership on tobacco & cancer disparity issues.

National Alliance for Hispanic Health

  • Establishment of national advisory committee
  • Development of network website (launch in 10 days)
  • Worked with their national partners to conduct an environmental scan in 10 different states

New Tips From Former Smokers Ad Features Effects of Tobacco & HIV

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     Felecia King

    Project Specialist

   The Network for LGBT Health Equity

 
 

This week, the CDC launched the next phase of the Tips From Former Smokers Campaign, and this time they are tackling the issue of tobacco and HIV. The ad features Brian, who smoked for 30 years, and suffered a stroke as a complication of his HIV and tobacco use. (read more about Brian’s story HERE)

Smoking is especially harmful to people who are living with HIV. For example, smokers with HIV:

  • Are at higher risk than non-smokers with HIV of developing lung cancer, head and neck cancers, cervical and anal cancers, and other cancers;
  • Are more likely than non-smokers with HIV to develop bacterial pneumonia, Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PCP), COPD, and heart disease;
  • Are more likely than non-smokers with HIV to develop two conditions that affect the mouth: oral candidiasis (thrush) and oral hairy leukoplakia; and
  • Have a poorer response to antiretroviral therapy.
  • People with HIV who smoke are also less likely to keep to their HIV treatment plan and have a greater likelihood of developing an AIDS-defining condition and dying earlier than non-smokers with HIV.

(the above examples are from Aids.gov <– Click the link for more info!)

For these reasons, smoking is a significant health issue for all individuals, but it is even more of a concern for people living with HIV, who tend to smoke more than the general population. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately 19% of adults in the United States are smokers. However, the smoking rate is two to three times higher among adults who are HIV-positive.

 

SmokingLGBT    

CDC SEEKING EX-SMOKERS TO BE IN FUTURE TIPS CAMPAIGN ADS- SPREAD THE WORD!

 
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CDC’s Office on Smoking and Health seeks ex-smokers
to be in Tips From Former Smokers campaign!
 
 
 
 
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Office on Smoking and Health are recruiting additional candidates to be considered for an upcoming national education campaign, Tips From Former Smokers (Tips). This campaign is similar to previous campaigns seen here, real people who have had life-changing, smoking-related health problems will be featured. They are conducting a national search to find people with compelling stories who are willing to participate in their campaign.

The CDC and OSH are seeking people from all backgrounds, and are particularly looking for candidates who are of Asian descent. All applicants must be tobacco-free for at least 6 months.

They are looking for ex-smokers who:

·         Have or have had colorectal cancer that was linked to cigarette smoking (ages 30–65).
·         Have or have had macular degeneration that was linked to cigarette smoking (ages 40–65).
·         Used cigars with cigarettes or used cigarillos or little cigars with or without cigarettes, thinking cigars, cigarillos and little cigars were healthier than cigarettes and developed a serious health condition while smoking (ages 20-60).
·         Used e-cigarettes or smokeless tobacco for at least a year while continuing to smoke some cigarettes; and
·         Thought using e-cigarettes or smokeless tobacco to cut back on some cigarettes would be good for your health; and
·         Despite cutting back, you were later diagnosed with a serious health condition.
All individuals should be comfortable sharing their story publicly and be able to articulate how their smoking-related condition has changed their life. The association between smoking and their condition must be clear, and candidates’ physicians will be contacted to verify that smoking contributed to the condition.

The CDC and OSH would like for you to help distribute this flyer (below). Please feel free to email it to anyone who might be willing to help CDC recruit for this campaign. The flyer can be posted in public areas or shared with anyone who may know people who fit the criteria above.

Feel free to print and share! click to enlarge

Feel free to print and share! click to enlarge

If you have questions, please send them to the CDC representative, Crystal Bruce, jgx6@cdc.gov.
Please put “Recruitment Question” in the subject line.

E-Cigarettes: Friend or Foe for the LGBT Communities?


E-Cigs

 As published on Huffington Post’s new LGBT Wellness blog, see original at: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/scout-phd/e-cigarettes-friend-or-foe_b_5024583.html

Working in tobacco control sometimes elicits interesting reactions from people. Some try to hide their smoking. While I certainly appreciate not being near the smoke itself, I’ve got great empathy for smokers. In fact, since most smokers have already tried to quit, they’re much more likely to be fellow fighters against tobacco than non-smokers. Sometimes they ask me how to best quit and I’m happy to tell them (hint, call 1-800-QUITNOW). These days everyone’s asking me something new: What about e-cigarettes? The shortest answer is “they could be helpful for a few, but we all worry about our youth.”

First, if you’re not familiar with e-cigs, they are battery-powered imitators of old-school cigarettes, designed to deliver nicotine, flavor and other chemicals through vapor inhaled by the user. Most of them have a swag little electronic light at the tip to make it seem more like an old-school cig. Some now have other names like e-hookah to avoid any cigarette associations. The claim is here’s a no-combustion device to get your nicotine fix, great for cessation and great to smoke in places where cigarettes are banned.

There is one study supporting the effects of e-cigs in helping people quit smoking but now another study is out contravening it. Considering how toxic cigarette smoke is, we all applaud anything that helps reduce the amount of cigarette smoke in the air. But if you’re trying to use e-cigs as a cessation device it’s a bit dicey right now because they’re unregulated, so the amount of nicotine you get in each dose varies, and sometimes does not match the advertising. It’s commonly known that it only takes about two weeks to kick the nicotine addiction of smoking, but anyone who’s quit will tell you, it’s the social habit of smoking that draws you back again and again. I’m not sure how putting a cigarette replacement in your mouth helps you kick that social habit — sounds to me like it’s just perpetuating it. Plus there is a new study showing other toxic chemicals in the vapor. To top it off, there’s no real science on the long-term effects of inhaling nicotine vapor. So while I’m willing to bet it’s better than inhaling tobacco smoke, that’s like saying I bet it’s better than inhaling truck exhaust. Nicotine is so toxic, poison control centers just issued an alert about high numbers of calls on accidental exposure. Just touching the liquid is enough to cause vomiting and ingesting as little as a teaspoon of some of the liquid nicotine concentrations can be fatal. I hope people set a higher bar for their own cessation journey.

The real problem is, as anyone who’s visited a vaporium can see, it’s not a cessation game. Vaporiums and e-cigs are all about enticing, and particularly enticing young people. Wander into your local vaporium belly up to the “bar” and you’ll be shocked to see how many vaporiums look like the lovechild of a hip coffee shop and a candy store. I’m not sure exactly which adult Marlboro user would switch to cotton candy flavored nicotine cartridges, or banana nut bread, or cherry limeade. Sounds to me more like flavors I’d find at a little league game. To make it worse, these products are easily available online and many states aren’t yet doing anything to restrict access to minors. Data show LGBT youth continue to smoke at rates much higher than their non-LGBT counterparts and the number of youth experimenting with e-cigs is rising rapidly… the very last thing we need is to have some fancy new gadgetry on the market enticing LGBT youth to start using a highly addictive drug to deal with the stress of stigma against us all.

We pass on smoking down through the LGBT generations socially. I’ve always called it an STD for us, a socially transmitted disease. So I also worry about adult e-cig use. Every time you “light up” you’re perpetuating the huge LGBT cigarette culture, all of us laughing and having fun and hanging out, with cigarettes in our mouths.

We already have cessation aids that deliver you nicotine in controlled regulated doses, you can find those on every drugstore shelf. Nicely, there’s not one gummy bear or watermelon flavored nicotine patch, spray or gum. So while e-cigs might help a few in quitting, I say the big picture on e-cigs for the LGBT communities is we need to think of our youth and “beware of the wolf in sheep’s clothing.”

_____

self-portrait-scout

 

 

 Dr. Scout, Director

 The Network for LGBT Health Equity

 

 

Follow Scout, Ph.D. on Twitter: www.twitter.com/scoutout

We’re working toward a tobacco-free future for LGBT communities!

Here at the National LGBT Cancer Network Summit in NYC, we wanted to get in on the Surgeon General Report excitement! #SGR50photo

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Farewell & Godspeed To Our Hero Terrie Hall

ScoutScout, Ph.D.
Director, The Network for LGBT Health Equity

This sad news came today from the CDC’s Office of Smoking and Health:Screen Shot 2013-09-17 at 1.02.05 PM

We are deeply saddened to announce the passing of Terrie Hall – a true American hero. Terrie appeared in ads run by CDC for the Tips From Former Smokers media campaign, which encouraged several  million smokers to try to quit. Terrie died on September 16th from the effects of the cancer caused by the cigarette smoking she began in high school. Treating her cancer required multiple surgeries over the years, including the loss of her voice box, leaving a hole in her throat.  This summer the cancer spread to her brain, and despite radiation and surgery, the cancer spread further.

 Terrie wanted to save people from having to go through the sickness and surgeries she endured.  She decided to let smokers and young people see her disfigurement and know what caused it, so that they would stop smoking – or better still, never start.  She spoke at schools and before other small groups. But the Tips from Former Smokers campaign gave Terrie her biggest platform.  More than a hundred million Americans saw her ads on television, the Internet, in magazines, on billboards and at bus stops — and many of them decided to try to quit smoking.  Strangers came up to her in drugstores and hugged her to thank her for inspiring them to quit.  By her willingness to show and tell people what cigarette smoking had done to her, Terrie saved thousands of American lives.

Tim McAfee, MD, MPH, Director, CDC’s Office on Smoking and HealthTerrieHall

I had the occasion to meet Terrie recently as she was getting a medal of commendation from the Surgeon General for her leadership in smoking cessation. Of every ad CDC has ever run, Terrie’s was the most compelling story, and we all knew how many people she affected with her famous lines “If you’re going to smoke, take a video of yourself so your grandchildren can see you before you sound like this.” Terrie made it her mission to show the reality of smoking’s impact, and she saved many lives in doing so. Deep bow to you our friend, you will not be forgotten, farewell & godspeed.

Upcoming webinar about CDC’s unveiling of “Talk with your doctor” sub-campaign- register today!

New Network Logo Symbol 3-2011
 
 
The Network for LGBT Health Equity 
Bringing you awesome Webinars and keeping you in the know! 
 
 
 
 
 

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A new feature of the CDC’s Tips From Former Smokers campaign was unveiled this week— “Talk With Your Doctor” (TWYD). The goal of this phase of the campaign is to engage health care providers and encourage them to use Tips as an opportunity to start a dialogue with their patients who smoke about quitting. It is also meant to serve as a reminder for smokers to talk with their healthcare providers about effective methods to help them quit.

As you may remember from our press release about the Tips campaign, “One of the ‘Tips from Former Smokers’ ads features a lesbian who suffers from asthma triggered by working in a smoke filled bar. Recently released data from the CDC shows that LGBT people smoke cigarettes at rates that are nearly 70% higher than the general population.” This new phase of the campaign is yet another amazing way to reach out to our communities about this huge disparity!

On Thursday, June 13th, The Network will be teaming up with the Gay and Lesbian Medical Association (GLMA) and CenterLink to bring you a webinar discussing the “Talk With Your Doctor” campaign, and the impact that it will have on the health of LGBT communities.

Join us at 2pm EST by registering HERE!

TTYD Campaign Webinar Flyer

APPLY NOW FOR NETWORK STEERING COMMITTEE POSITIONS!

New Network Logo Symbol 3-2011

 
 
The Network for LGBT Health Equity
 The time has come: Apply to be a part of our dynamic Steering Committee!
Applications due by June 3rd, 2013
 
 
 

The Network for LGBT Health Equity is now accepting applications to fill four positions on its 13 member Steering Committee!

The purpose of the committee is to provide multidisciplinary input and guidance on activities for the Network. Members will participate by sharing information regarding tobacco and other LGBT health disparity opportunities, providing input on National Network efforts, and considering strategic policy enhancements that further LGBT health disparity work at their organizations.

Responsibilities:

  •  Attend regularly scheduled phone meetings (generally once or twice a month maximum)
  • Attend one in-person meetings per year (paid for by the Network)
  • Review and give feedback on policy, direction, and strategic planning of Network Activities
  • Strategize effective ways to increase Network visibility, organizational outreach, and membership
  • Identify and increase the engagement of subgroups within the LGBT community (i.e., youth, rural, elder, etc)
  • Support and enhance the goals and objectives of the Network in a changing environment
  • Engage agency/coalition groups on pertinent issues/opportunities and report back to the Committee

If you are interested in applying for the committee, the following is required (please send CV/Resume and Statement of Interest to lgbthealthequity@gmail.com):

The Youth/Young Adult Nomination process is slightly varied. 

If you are  between 18-24 years old and would like to apply to be on the committee, click here to fill out the Youth/Young Adult Steering Committee Application form online. Youth/young adults can also apply through the general nominations process (candidacy will not be affected by either application) and follow the same guidelines by submitting the following:

All Nominations must be submitted on or before Monday, June 3rd, 2013 by 3PM EST

To: lgbthealthequity@gmail.com Subject: Steering Committee Nomination

You will receive a confirmation email within 2 working days of your email nomination. If you do not receive a confirmation email within 2 working days, please resend and call 617.927.6452 to ensure delivery. If you are submitting a nomination on the due date and have not received a confirmation by 4PM EST please call 617.927.6452 before 5PM EST to resend or confirm delivery. Nominations received after 6/3/2013 at 3PM EST will not be accepted.
We look forward to reviewing your applications. Please feel free to contact us with any questions!
 
Thank you,
Network Steering Committee and Staff